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Monday, March 05, 2007

Titian


In Rome, Titian encountered the older Michelangelo, who admired the Venetian's style and colour but said it was a pity that Titian never learned to draw properly. Pope Paul III, an art lover, divided work between the two rivals. He pressed Michelangelo for The Last Judgment, but asked Titian to do his portraits.

Titian's most important subject was Charles V, whom he met in 1530, the year Charles was crowned Holy Roman Emperor. The Emperor was so taken with the artist that when Titian dropped a brush during a sitting, the ruler himself picked it up. Titian protested, but Charles replied, "Titian is worthy of being served by Caesar."


TIZIANO Vecellio
(b. 1490, Pieve di Cadore, d. 1576, Venezia)
Portrait of Charles V Seated
1548
Oil on canvas, 205 x 122 cm
Alte Pinakothek, Munich


TIZIANO Vecellio
(b. 1490, Pieve di Cadore, d. 1576, Venezia)
Portrait of Pope Paul III
Oil on canvas
Cathedral Museum, Toledo



TIZIANO Vecellio
(b. 1490, Pieve di Cadore, d. 1576, Venezia)
Pope Paul III with his Grandsons Alessandro and Ottavio Farnese1546
Oil on canvas, 200 x 127 cm
Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples



TIZIANO Vecellio
(b. 1490, Pieve di Cadore, d. 1576, Venezia)
Pope Paul III with his Grandsons Alessandro and Ottavio Farnese (detail)
1546
Oil on canvas, 200 x 127 cm
Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples